BOIKIDO WOODEN MUSICAL PLAY TABLE : BOIKIDO WOODEN MUSICAL


Boikido Wooden Musical Play Table : Red Coffee Tables.



Boikido Wooden Musical Play Table





boikido wooden musical play table






    musical play
  • A play with music added, but the music is not integral to the plot; remove it, and the play is still perfectly coherent. Alternately, a "serious" musical, according to Ethan Mordden. Under this definition, Cabaret would be a musical play, while Hello, Dolly would be a musical comedy.

  • Musical theatre is a form of theatre combining music, songs, spoken dialogue and dance. The emotional content of the piece – humor, pathos, love, anger – as well as the story itself, is communicated through the words, music, movement and technical aspects of the entertainment as an integrated

  • light stage entertainment that has become the 'musical'





    wooden
  • lacking ease or grace; "the actor's performance was wooden"; "a wooden smile"

  • made or consisting of (entirely or in part) or employing wood; "a wooden box"; "an ancient cart with wooden wheels"

  • (woodenly) ungraciously: without grace; rigidly; "they moved woodenly"

  • Made of wood

  • Stiff and awkward in movement or manner

  • Like or characteristic of wood





    table
  • a set of data arranged in rows and columns; "see table 1"

  • Present formally for discussion or consideration at a meeting

  • postpone: hold back to a later time; "let's postpone the exam"

  • Postpone consideration of

  • a piece of furniture having a smooth flat top that is usually supported by one or more vertical legs; "it was a sturdy table"











boikido wooden musical play table - The Commercial




The Commercial Theater Institute Guide to Producing Plays and Musicals


The Commercial Theater Institute Guide to Producing Plays and Musicals



Now in its 25th year, the Commercial Theater Institute sponsors an annual intensive program in New York for individuals interested in producing or investing in the theatre that attracts people from all over the world. The top working theatre professionals offer hard, factual information to those interested in producing for Broadway, Off-Broadway, Off-Off-Broadway, anywhere in North America, as well as in the United Kingdom. The Commercial Theater Institute Guide to Producing Plays and Musicals now collects for the first time the cream of the crop of that advice, from the noted theatre professionals who participate in the program, in their own words. Interviews, contributions, and a resource directory are included from 30 theatre professionals who have won a total of 45 Tony Awards. Agents, directors, production designers, general managers, fundraisers, marketing directors, producers, and theatrical attorneys all offer invaluable advice in a book that will be the definitive resource in its field.










80% (14)





Musical Chairs




Musical Chairs





Awana is back up and running this year, and that's perhaps why I've been so tardy in posting any type of pictures for a while. I've been acting as photographer for the Awana club, trying to capture the heart and spirit of what it is that happens while the kids are there. These pictures will ultimately become the end of year presentation so the pressure is really on. The main challenge is that I've found that while most people can enjoy an artful interpretation of an activity, most just really want to see their children having fun.

This is one of those pictures that compositionally is quite bad, but that will make at least three other parents quite happy. With due respect for those that don't want their children on the internet, it is also one of those that shows as few distinguishing features as possible.

This is Paige's second and last year in Cubbies. Her vest is filling out nicely with awards, and she already looking forward to being five and moving on to Sparks. I think this has to do mostly with the fact that she's grown considerably over the past year, and that she's finding the first-year Cubbies to be less than tolerable. She doesn't seem to recall that she too was in that position the year previous. Not that a four year old should of course, which is why she's ready to move on.

Some of her friends from other church activities, or the friends she plays with before and after Awana, are also already in Sparks, so she misses them when she has to head off to Cubbies.

There's some new leaders this year too, which has added some great freshness to our group. Two of the younger leaders in Cubbies, who happened to be Truth in Training students last year, run the Cubbie games most of the time. This usually consists of "Duck. Duck. Goose." where the kids express their tendencies towards favoritism, and becomes dull quickly. The follow-up then is "Red light. Green light." where everybody is so competitive that they really don't care so much about the rules, or lights, and just run for the game leader.

I was surprised then the other day when I walked in to see them playing musical chairs. I was also surprised to see how well the kids were playing the classic game. Everybody seemed to be able to related to running around in circles while dancing to music. And everybody seemed to enjoy dashing to sit in a chair. When a chair was taken away, and one player was removed, there were no tears, simply anticipation for who would finally win. For the record, when there was only one of the chairs left above, Paige was sitting in it making her the winner.











"The Rehearsal" - Workshop as part of Musical Playthings




"The Rehearsal" - Workshop as part of Musical Playthings





THE REHEARSAL
A Play About A Musical

Book by Jeremy Forbing
Music by Celine Massuger
Lyrics by Jeremy Forbing and Celine Massuger

Directed by Dan Korth
Musical Direction by Celine Massuger

A Staged Reading (and Singing!) of a Work in Progress
Performed by Students of the
Musical Theatre Workshop Class

The cast is as follows:

Brenda, the stage manager
Played by Casi Shane
Claire, the co-writer and co-producer, estranged wife of Devon
Played by Kaitlin Schuster
Devon, performer who plays Sam (the male lead) in the musical—also co-writer, co-producer, and estranged husband of Claire
Played by Stephen Brookins
Emma, performer, pianist and unofficial musical director
Played by Kate Patton
Hector, a performer who plays a Chef in the musical
Played by Paul Jordan
Greg, a performer who plays a Busboy in the musical
Played by Ryo Harada
Felix, a performer who plays a Chef in the musical
Played by Daniel Schultz
Inez, a performer who plays a Server in the musical
Played by Chloe Condon
Kip, a performer who understudies the role of Sam in the musical
Played by James Mayagoitia
Marie, the performer who plays Rachel (the female lead) in the musical
Played by Celine Massuger
Nik, the new director
Played by Mikka Bonel
Olivia, a performer who plays a Server in the musical
Played by Molly Clancy
Pat, a performer who plays Aubrey St. Michaels in the musical
Played by John Willis
Quinn, a performer who plays a (decreasing) number of roles in the musical
Played by John Duarte
Tina, Devon’s new lover, a performer who plays Vicki in the musical
Played by Jennifer Bacich
Zoe, a performer who plays a Server in the musical
Played by Megan Hopp











boikido wooden musical play table








boikido wooden musical play table




Play On!: A New Musical (1997 Original Broadway Cast)






The spiritual successor to Broadway's 1981 Duke Ellington tribute, Sophisticated Ladies, 1997's Play On! differs from the earlier show's song-dance-revue format by presenting an actual story, in this case Shakespeare's Twelfth Night transported to Harlem. And while Sophisticated Ladies's pedigree included the composer's son, Mercer, directing the music and his daughter, Mercedes, in the cast, Play On! benefited from the same Mercedes contributing the choreography and making available her father's vast catalog. The result is a powerhouse combination of a strong cast (including Cheryl Freeman, Carl Anderson, Lawrence Hamilton, and Tonya Pinkins), master arranger Luther Henderson, and 19 great Ellington songs, among them "Take the 'A' Train," "Mood Indigo," "Don't Get Around Much Anymore," and "It Don't Mean a Thing." --David Horiuchi










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